Long Call, Long Haul (part 3)

May 29, 2012

A three-part series describing the demands of life on the wards … and what you can do about it!

 

Part 3:  Make health work for you

For Jim, an accessible place to start staying healthy on the wards is food—for you, it might be food, yoga, social time with friends, staying away from alcohol or something else. Here’s the breakdown of what I find works for life on the wards, easily customizable to where you’re starting out.

For those of you just thinking about getting healthier, or for whom health goes out the window on tough rotations, I’ll steal from Weight Watchers and use a point system, of sorts. Think of it this way: each nutritious home-cooked meal, with veggies and whole grains and maybe some fish, counts as one point. Bringing a healthy lunch, making it to a yoga class or the gym, sticking to one beer (even on your days off!), seeing a friend outside of medicine and laughing about your job, getting a massage… each one of these counts as a point.  Can you get to three points a week? Maybe five? I consider three points a week victory over the battle with time that is month of floors or two weeks of night float. Five points a week is winning the war. Just take it one point at a time. Continue reading “Long Call, Long Haul (part 3)”

Long Call, Long Haul (part 2)

May 22, 2012

A three-part series profiling life on the wards… and what you can do about it!


Part 2:  What’s your health-type?

I am labeled, fairly I guess, by many in my intern class as a “health nut.” I bring breakfast – whole grain cereal with almonds in a little plastic bag – and lunch – an avocado sandwich, yoghurt, and a nibble of dark chocolate – from home every day. I won’t touch the cafeteria food or the greasy Chinese served at mid-day report. I live far from the hospital and close to my yoga studio, a deliberate choice, which means a 25-30 minute subway ride downtown rather than a walk across the street to my apartment. I’m vegetarian. I hosted a talk on Ayurvedic medicine for the housestaff. I’m going into integrative medicine. If I am a health nut, it’s not accidental. Continue reading “Long Call, Long Haul (part 2)”

Long Call, Long Haul (part 1)

May 14, 2012

A three-part series describing the demands of life on the wards … and what you can do about it!

Part 1:  The “life” of an intern

On July 1, 2011 the new ACGME rules on intern duty hours in hospitals took effect. Interns, though not residents, were no longer allowed to work 27-hour shifts as residents everywhere historically had done. The 80-hour work-week still applied, but instead of staying in-house overnight, interns were supposed to have ten full hours away from the hospital between every shift.

Also on July 1, 2011 I started my intern year at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. I had done routine 27-hour shifts during medical school, as a fourth year sub-intern in the Cardiac Care Unit (CCU) and as a third year on labor and delivery shifts, a standard part of the OBGYN rotation. And while these were something of a distant memory following a very chilled out fourth year filled with electives and one trip to Africa, I remembered them well enough. The slightly dizzy feeling of walking out of the hospital into the sun at 11am followed by a brief period of sleep-deprivation-induced mania; the great excuse to cram my face with my favorite pastry from the bakery down the street; and the 4-5 hours of slightly nauseated waves of sleep before getting up and having “a day off,” for me usually consisting of a yoga class and dinner before going to bed. Continue reading “Long Call, Long Haul (part 1)”

How Dr. X got his groove back

October 31, 2011

I have a friend. Let’s call him Dr. X. And like many of my other close friends and family members, as he went through medical school and residency, he lost his core.

Before Dr. X became an M.D., homeboy had it goin’ on! He was fit, he played all kinds of sports regularly, went to the gym often, and even let it drop to the ladies that his six-pack was in fiiiine shape. But with the long study hours, the all-consuming focus on medicine, and the insane hours of lectures, rotations, and residency, everything changed. And he started to notice changes around his middle, as his rectus abdominis slackened and (gasp) love handles started to appear. His low back had even started to hurt.

He was determined to get his groove back. He called me up and bemoaned the physical changes, asking for advice. Talking to the ladies was not feeling the same. He still had at least six years left of residency and fellowship – what to do?

Continue reading “How Dr. X got his groove back”